Managing marine disease emergencies in an era of rapid change

Groner, Maya, Maynard, Jeffrey, Breyta, Rachel, Carnegie, Ryan B., Dobson, Andy, Friedman, Carolyn S., Froelich, Brett, Garren, Melissa, Gulland, Frances M.D., Heron, Scott F., Noble, Rachel T., Revie, Crawford W., Shields, Jeffrey D., Vanderstichel, Raphaël, Weil, Ernesto, Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy, and Harvell, C. Drew (2016) Managing marine disease emergencies in an era of rapid change. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 371 (1689). pp. 1-10.

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Abstract

Infectious marine diseases can decimate populations and are increasing among some taxa due to global change and our increasing reliance on marine environments. Marine diseases become emergencies when significant ecological, economic or social impacts occur. We can prepare for and manage these emergencies through improved surveillance, and the development and iterative refinement of approaches to mitigate disease and its impacts. Improving surveillance requires fast, accurate diagnoses, forecasting disease risk and real-time monitoring of disease-promoting environmental conditions. Diversifying impact mitigation involves increasing host resilience to disease, reducing pathogen abundance and managing environmental factors that facilitate disease. Disease surveillance and mitigation can be adaptive if informed by research advances and catalysed by communication among observers, researchers and decision-makers using information-sharing platforms. Recent increases in the awareness of the threats posed by marine diseases may lead to policy frameworks that facilitate the responses and management that marine disease emergencies require.

Item ID: 42944
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: adaptive management; marine disease; response plan, surveillance, impact mitigation; environmental law
ISSN: 1471-2970
Funders: National Science Foundation (NSF), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI) Canada
Projects and Grants: NSF Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease RCN Grant No. OCE-1215977, NOAA Climate Programme Office Grant NA13OAR4310127
Date Deposited: 01 Aug 2016 05:12
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050206 Environmental Monitoring @ 100%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9605 Ecosystem Assessment and Management > 960507 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Marine Environments @ 100%
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