Hendra virus survival does not explain spillover patterns and implicates relatively direct transmission routes from flying foxes to horses

Martin, Gerardo, Plowright, Raina, Chen, Carla, Kault, David, Selleck, Paul, and Skerratt, Lee F. (2015) Hendra virus survival does not explain spillover patterns and implicates relatively direct transmission routes from flying foxes to horses. Journal of General Virology, 96. pp. 1229-1237.

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Abstract

Hendra virus (HeV) is lethal to humans and horses, and little is known about its epidemiology. Biosecurity restrictions impede advances, particularly on understanding pathways of transmission. Quantifying the environmental survival of HeV can be used for making decisions and to infer transmission pathways. We estimated HeV survival with a Weibull distribution and calculated parameters from data generated in laboratory experiments. HeV survival rates based on air temperatures 24 h after excretion ranged from 2 to 10 % in summer and from 12 to 33 % in winter. Simulated survival across the distribution of the black flying fox (Pteropus alecto), a key reservoir host, did not predict spillover events. Based on our analyses we concluded that the most likely pathways of transmission did not require long periods of virus survival and were likely to involve relatively direct contact with flying fox excreta shortly after excretion.

Item ID: 42383
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Additional Information:

A version of this publication was included as Chapter 3 of the following PhD thesis: Martín Muñoz de Cote, Gerardo Antonio (2017) Modelling transmission of Hendra virus from flying foxes to horses. PhD thesis, James Cook University, which is available Open Access in ResearchOnline@JCU. Please see the Related URLs for access.

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ISSN: 1465-2099
Funders: Commonwealth of Australia, State of New South Wales, State of Queensland
Projects and Grants: National Hendra Virus Program
Date Deposited: 21 Apr 2016 00:06
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1108 Medical Microbiology > 110804 Medical Virology @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920109 Infectious Diseases @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920120 Zoonoses @ 50%
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