Albuminuria and its associated biomedical factors among indigenous adults in Far North Queensland: a 7-year follow up study

Li, Ming, and McDermott, Robyn (2015) Albuminuria and its associated biomedical factors among indigenous adults in Far North Queensland: a 7-year follow up study. BMC Nephrology, 16 (208). pp. 1-8.

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Abstract

Background: To document albuminuria prevalence and its associated factors in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (TSI) adults with high renal and metabolic risks from 19 rural and remote north Queensland communities.

Methods: One thousand nine hundred seventy-one indigenous adults were enrolled in 1998 and 566 completed follow up in 2007 in this population-based study. Measurements included weight, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), fasting glucose, lipids, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), urinary albumin creatinine ratio (UACR), smoking, alcohol intake and physical activity (PA). Albuminuria was defined as an UACR > =2.5 g/mol in males and > =3.5 g/mol in females. The association between albuminuria and biomedical factors was assessed with generalised linear modelling.

Results: Baseline albuminuria prevalence was 19.7 % (95 % CI: 18.0–21.6 %). Follow up prevalence was 42.4 % (95 % CI: 38.4–46.5 %) among the 566 adults having the 2nd UACR measurements. Follow-up albuminuria was associated with fasting glucose of 5.4 mmol/L (OR 2.5, 95 % CI 1.5–4.2), GGT tertiles in a dose-response manner (OR 2.0 for 2nd and 3.7 for 3rd tertile, p for trend <0.001), and abdominal overweight and obesity (OR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.1–3.9 and 5.4, 95 % CI: 2.2–13.5 respectively). Aboriginal people with diabetes were three times more likely of having albuminuria compared to TSI counterparts, while TSI smokers had twice the likelihood (95 % CI 1.2–3.2). At both baseline and follow up, albuminuria was more prevalent among older participants.

Conclusions: Indigenous Australians in north Queensland are at high risk of albuminuria. Overweight and obesity, glycaemia, increased GGT, and smoking were associated with albuminuria at baseline and/or follow up.

Item ID: 42358
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1471-2369
Keywords: albuminuria prevalence; Australian Indigenous populations; overweight and obesity; blood glucose and diabetes; gamma-glutamyltransferase; smoking
Additional Information:

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​4.​0/​), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://​creativecommons.​org/​publicdomain/​zero/​1.​0/​) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Funders: National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)
Projects and Grants: NHMRC Grant No. 279402
Date Deposited: 03 Feb 2016 01:34
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110312 Nephrology and Urology @ 34%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health @ 33%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology @ 33%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9203 Indigenous Health > 920302 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Health Status and Outcomes @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920408 Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being) @ 50%
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