Avian influenza in Australia: a summary of 5 years of wild bird surveillance

Grillo, V.L., Arzey, K.E., Hansbro, P.M., Hurt, A.C., Warner, S., Bergfeld, J., Burgess, G.W., Cookson, B., Dickason, C.J., Ferenczi, M., Hollingsworth, T., Hoque, M.D., Jackson, R.B., Klaassen, M., Kirkland, P.D., Kung, N.Y., Lisovski, S., O'Dea, M.A., O'Riley, K., Roshier, D., Skerratt, L.F., Tracey, J.P., Wang, X., Woods, R., and Post, L. (2015) Avian influenza in Australia: a summary of 5 years of wild bird surveillance. Australian Veterinary Journal, 93 (11). pp. 387-393.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12379
 
5
3


Abstract

Background: Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are found worldwide in numerous bird species, causing significant disease in gallinaceous poultry and occasionally other species. Surveillance of wild bird reservoirs provides an opportunity to add to the understanding of the epidemiology of AIVs.

Methods: This study examined key findings from the National Avian Influenza Wild Bird Surveillance Program over a 5-year period (July 2007-June 2012), the main source of information on AIVs circulating in Australia.

Results: The overall proportion of birds that tested positive for influenza A via PCR was 1.90.1%, with evidence of widespread exposure of Australian wild birds to most low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) subtypes (H1-13, H16). LPAI H5 subtypes were found to be dominant and widespread during this 5-year period.

Conclusion: Given Australia's isolation, both geographically and ecologically, it is important for Australia not to assume that the epidemiology of AIV from other geographic regions applies here. Despite all previous highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks in Australian poultry being attributed to H7 subtypes, widespread detection of H5 subtypes in wild birds may represent an ongoing risk to the Australian poultry industry.

Item ID: 41700
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: Australia, avian influenza, biosecurity, surveillance, wild birds
ISSN: 1751-0813
Funders: Australian Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Wildlife Exotic Disease Preparedness Program, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC), Australian Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre (AB-CRC), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (RIRDC)
Projects and Grants: NIH contract NIAIDHHSN266200700010C, RIRDC Project No PRJ-008337; 2011-2012
Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2015 18:43
FoR Codes: 07 AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES > 0707 Veterinary Sciences > 070704 Veterinary Epidemiology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960405 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species at Regional or Larger Scales @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 3
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page