The potential for poverty to lower the self-efficacy of adults with asthma: an Australian longitudinal study

Callander, Emily J., and Schofield, Deborah J. (2016) The potential for poverty to lower the self-efficacy of adults with asthma: an Australian longitudinal study. Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Research, 8 (2). pp. 141-145.

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Abstract

Purpose: It is known that strong feelings of self-efficacy are linked with better management of asthma. However, it is not known whether the experience of poverty can detrimentally impact the self-efficacy feelings of asthma patients. This paper aims to determine whether falling into income or multidimensional poverty lowers self-efficacy among people diagnosed with asthma.

Methods: Longitudinal analysis of Waves 7 to 11 (2007 to 2011) of the nationally representative Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey using generalized linear models. The analysis was limited to those who had been diagnosed with asthma. The Freedom Poverty Measure was used to identify those in multidimensional poverty.

Results: People with asthma who fell into income poverty had significantly lower self-efficacy scores–23% lower (95% CI: -35.1 to -9.1), after falling into income poverty for 3 or 4 years between 2007 and 2011 compared to those who were never in income poverty. Those who fell into multidimensional poverty also had significantly lower self-efficacy scores–25% lower (95% CI: -42.8 to -2.0), after being in multidimensional poverty for 3 or 4 years between 2007 and 2011 compared to those who were never in poverty.

Conclusions: Asthmatics who fall into poverty are likely to experience a decline in their feelings of self-efficacy. The findings of this study show that experiencing poverty should be a flag to identify those who may need extra assistance in managing their condition.

Item ID: 41159
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2092-7363
Keywords: asthma; poverty; self-efficacy; management
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This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Funders: National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)
Projects and Grants: NHMRC APP1052742
Date Deposited: 04 Nov 2015 02:09
FoR Codes: 14 ECONOMICS > 1402 Applied Economics > 140208 Health Economics @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920408 Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being) @ 50%
91 ECONOMIC FRAMEWORK > 9102 Microeconomics > 910209 Preference, Behaviour and Welfare @ 50%
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