Entomological monitoring and evaluation: diverse transmission settings of ICEMR projects will require local and regional malaria elimination strategies

Conn, Jan E., Norris, Douglas E., Donnelly, Martin J., Beebe, Nigel W., Burkot, Thomas R., Coulibaly, Mamadou B., Chery, Laura, Eapen, Alex, Keven, John B., Kilama, Maxwell, Kumar, Ashwani, Lindsay, Steve W., Moreno, Marta, Quinones, Martha, Reimer, Lisa J., Russell, Tanya L., Smith, David L., Thomas, Matthew B., Walker, Edward D., Wilson, Mark L., and Yan, Guiyun (2015) Entomological monitoring and evaluation: diverse transmission settings of ICEMR projects will require local and regional malaria elimination strategies. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 93 (Suppl 3). pp. 28-41.

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Abstract

The unprecedented global efforts for malaria elimination in the past decade have resulted in altered vectorial systems, vector behaviors, and bionomics. These changes combined with increasingly evident heterogeneities in malaria transmission require innovative vector control strategies in addition to the established practices of long-lasting insecticidal nets and indoor residual spraying. Integrated vector management will require focal and tailored vector control to achieve malaria elimination. This switch of emphasis from universal coverage to universal coverage plus additional interventions will be reliant on improved entomological monitoring and evaluation. In 2010, the National Institutes for Allergies and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) established a network of malaria research centers termed ICEMRs (International Centers for Excellence in Malaria Research) expressly to develop this evidence base in diverse malaria endemic settings. In this article, we contrast the differing ecology and transmission settings across the ICEMR study locations. In South America, Africa, and Asia, vector biologists are already dealing with many of the issues of pushing to elimination such as highly focal transmission, proportionate increase in the importance of outdoor and crepuscular biting, vector species complexity, and "sub patent" vector transmission.

Item ID: 40410
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Additional Information:

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

ISSN: 1476-1645
Funders: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID)
Date Deposited: 08 Sep 2015 23:16
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0603 Evolutionary Biology > 060303 Biological Adaptation @ 50%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0608 Zoology > 060808 Invertebrate Biology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified @ 100%
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