Non alcoholic steatohepatitis a precursor for hepatocellular carcinoma development

Jiang, Chun-Meng, Pu, Chun-Wen, Hou, Ya-Hui, Chen, Zhe, Alanazy, Mohammed, and Hebbard, Lionel (2014) Non alcoholic steatohepatitis a precursor for hepatocellular carcinoma development. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 20 (44). pp. 16464-16473.

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Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing in prevalence and is one of the most common cancers in the world. Chief amongst the risks of attaining HCC are hepatitis B and C infection, aflatoxin B1 ingestion, alcoholism and obesity. The later has been shown to promote non alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can lead to the inflammatory form non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is a complex metabolic disorder that can impact greatly on hepatic function. The mechanisms by which NASH promotes HCC are only beginning to be characterized. Here in this review, we give an overview of the recent novel mechanisms published that have been associated with NASH and subsequent HCC progression. We will focus our discussion on inflammation and gut derived inflammation and how they contribute to NASH driven HCC.

Item ID: 40187
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2219-2840
Keywords: nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, inflammation, microbiome, bile acids
Funders: Robert W Storr Bequest to the Sydney Medical Foundation University of Sydney, Cancer Council NSW (CC), Cancer Institute of NSW
Projects and Grants: CC grant 1069733
Date Deposited: 26 Aug 2015 02:25
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis > 111201 Cancer Cell Biology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920102 Cancer and Related Disorders @ 100%
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