Of monkeys and men: immunomic profiling of sera from humans and non-human primates resistant to schistosomiasis reveals novel potential vaccine candidates

Pearson, Mark S., Becker, Luke, Driguez, Patrick, Young, Neil D., Gaze Jangola, Soraya, Mendes, Tiago, Li, Xiao-Hong, Doolan, Denise L., Midzi, Nicholas, Mduluza, Takafira, McManus, Donald P., Wilson, R. Alan, Bethony, Jeffrey M., Nausch, Norman, Mutapi, Francisca, Felgner, Philip L., and Loukas, Alex (2015) Of monkeys and men: immunomic profiling of sera from humans and non-human primates resistant to schistosomiasis reveals novel potential vaccine candidates. Frontiers in Immunology, 6. 213. pp. 1-13.

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Abstract

Schistosoma haematobium affects more than 100 million people throughout Africa and is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis. The parasite is strongly associ-ated with urothelial cancer in infected individuals and as such is designated a group I carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Using a protein microarray containing schistosome proteins, we sought to identify antigens that were the targets of protective IgG1 immune responses in S. haematobium-exposed individuals that acquire drug-induced resistance (DIR) to schistosomiasis after praziquantel treatment. Numerous antigens with known vaccine potential were identified, including calpain (Smp80), tetraspanins, glutathione-S-transferases, and glucose transporters (SGTP1), as well as previously uncharacterized proteins. Reactive IgG1 responses were not elevated in exposed individuals who did not acquire DIR. To complement our human subjects study, we screened for antigen targets of rhesus macaques rendered resistant to S. japonicum by experimental infection followed by self-cure, and discovered a number of new and known vaccine targets, including major targets recognized by our human subjects. This study has further validated the immunomics-based approach to schistosomiasis vaccine antigen discovery and identified numerous novel potential vaccine antigens.

Item ID: 39212
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1664-3224
Keywords: schistosomiasis, protein microarray, vaccine, human, drug-induced resistance
Additional Information:

© 2015 Pearson, Becker, Driguez, Young, Gaze, Mendes, Li, Doolan, Midzi, Mduluza, McManus, Wilson, Bethony, Nausch, Mutapi, Felgner and Loukas. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

Funders: National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC), Wellcome Trust (WT), Cunningham Trust, Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland, Shanghai Science and Technology Commission (SSTC)
Projects and Grants: NHMRC Project Grant APP1037304, WT 082028MA, SSTC Grant no: 15ZR1444300
Date Deposited: 17 Jun 2015 01:52
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1108 Medical Microbiology > 110803 Medical Parasitology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920109 Infectious Diseases @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920102 Cancer and Related Disorders @ 5%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920412 Preventive Medicine @ 45%
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