Role of gender in sexual behaviours and response to education in sexually transmitted infections in 17-year-old adolescents

Rembeck, Gun, and Gunnarsson, Ronny (2012) Role of gender in sexual behaviours and response to education in sexually transmitted infections in 17-year-old adolescents. In: [Presented at the 2012 International Symposium on Education and Psychology]. From: ISEP 2012: International Symposium on Education and Psychology, 30 March - 1 April 2012, Hong Kong. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background: The values we develop in our youth will follow us through life. To study the behavior of young people do not learn us how young people's future will be, but can give us knowledge about how the future can be. Nearly all sexually transmitted diseases is increasing in our country today, many sexually transmitted diseases increase the risk of infertility in both men and women and is certified by the Swedish Communicable Diseases Act as a danger to society. The reasons for the increase in sexually transmitted diseases is not fully understood. Probably it depends on several factors. Virtually every country in the world has more STDs than Sweden. We know that young people today are traveling more than ever and thus bring home communicable diseases. Immigration and tourism will also affect to our country. In many countries tracking partners to infected patients are not mandatory as in Sweden. Today's young people postpone their family formation, which means that many "have time" for more partners than previous generations. A change of attitude to a more permissive approach to sexual contacts without love and relations is also seen in both sexes and contribute to this development. This is for the young woman a revolutionary change. The availability of pornography is unlimited, which may contribute to sexual risk behavior. The HIV / AIDS Campaign during the 80s and 90s when HIV / AIDS became known meant more condom use and more restrictive sex.

HIV is in many countries in the world, a major threat to population health. Young people need information and knowledge. They need forums where attitudes and behavior in sexual issues and sexually transmitted diseases are discussed. The aim of the study was to examine gender differences in high school students with respect to sexual risk behavior, and young people's perception of the effect of education on sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The study also aimed to examine differences between students in the academic program compared to vocational programs.

Methods: Students invited to participate were in the second year in high school (about 17 years old) and were from two municipalities in southwestern Sweden. After a 60-minute lesson in sex and relationships they were offered to answer a questionnaire about sexual experiences, sexual risk behavior and the effect of education on sexually transmitted diseases.

Results: Boys took less responsibility for STI prevention than girls. In addition, boys were less influenced by STI education than girls. The girls had more experience of homosexuality than men.

Conclusions and implications for the practitioner: Boys take less responsibility for STI prevention compared to girls. When planning the STI education, it is important to consider gender, traditions and different learning styles. If STI education does not reach the boys, the prevalence of these infections will continue to increase.

Item ID: 37976
Item Type: Conference Item (Abstract / Summary)
Keywords: sexually transmitted diseases, gender
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The full version of this paper was published as: Rembeck, Gun I., and Gunnarsson, Ronny K. (2011) Role of gender in sexual behaviours and response to education in sexually transmitted infections in 17-year-old adolescents. Midwifery, 27 (2). pp. 282-287

Date Deposited: 05 Oct 2016 00:06
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111717 Primary Health Care @ 90%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine > 111404 Reproduction @ 10%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health @ 100%
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