An observational study of sun-protective behaviour at an outdoor spectator sporting event in a region of high sun exposure

Nikles, Jane, and Harrison, Simone Lee (2013) An observational study of sun-protective behaviour at an outdoor spectator sporting event in a region of high sun exposure. Journal of Carcinogenesis & Mutagenesis, S4 (3). pp. 1-6.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (316kB) | Preview
View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2157-2518.S4-0...
 
118


Abstract

Introduction: Few studies have described observed sun-protection behaviours. We aimed to describe the prevalence of observed sun-protection behaviour of a high-risk population in tropical Queensland engaged in outdoor leisure activity, to act as a baseline for future comparisons and to highlight the need for further work to improve sun-protective behaviours in this high risk population. Methods: Unobtrusive observations of clothing worn by 457 attendees at the Supercar Championship in Townsville, Queensland, Australia were conducted in an unshaded area around solar noon, in July 2009. A descriptive and chi-square analysis was conducted using SPSS.

Results: Caps were the most popular hat choice. Significantly more children (45.1%) than adults (27.1%) wore wide-brimmed/legionnaires/ bucket hats. Many women (35.3%), girls (26.3%), men (24.5%) and boys (18.8%) wore no hat. Significantly more females (34.3%) than males (23.9%) wore no hat. Significantly more women (17.4%) than men (6.6%) wore full-length/ ¾-sleeves. Short-sleeve shirts were worn by 90% of men and 55% of women. A further 28% of women wore sleeveless/cap-sleeved shirts. These proportions were significantly different. More girls (27.7%) than boys (3%) wore sleeveless/cap-sleeved shirts. More boys (87.9%) than girls (61.1%) wore short-sleeves. Both these proportions were significantly different. Full-length/ ¾-sleeves were equally uncommon among boys (9.1%) and girls (11.1%).

Conclusions: Despite a widespread SunSmart campaign in Australia over the past three decades, observed sun protection behaviour at this event were not consistent with Cancer Council Australia recommendations for personal sun protection.

Item ID: 37724
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2157-2518
Keywords: skin cancer; Australia; ultraviolet radiation; sun protection; spectator sport
Additional Information:

© 2014 Nikles J, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Funders: Queensland Health
Date Deposited: 11 Mar 2015 03:23
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111716 Preventive Medicine @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health @ 30%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920412 Preventive Medicine @ 30%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified @ 40%
Downloads: Total: 118
Last 12 Months: 22
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page