A randomized controlled trial of a multiple health behavior change intervention delivered to colorectal cancer survivors: effects on sedentary behavior

Lynch, Brigid M., Courneya, Kerry S., Sethi, Parneet, Patrao, Tania A., and Hawkes, Anna L. (2014) A randomized controlled trial of a multiple health behavior change intervention delivered to colorectal cancer survivors: effects on sedentary behavior. Cancer, 120 (17). pp. 2665-2672.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sedentary behavior may independently contribute to morbidity and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether a telephone-delivered multiple health behavior change intervention had an effect on the sedentary behavior of recently diagnosed colorectal cancer survivors.

METHODS: A total of 410 participants were recruited through the Queensland Cancer Registry and randomized to the health coaching (intervention) or usual-care (control) group. Eleven health coaching sessions addressing multiple health behaviors, including sedentary behavior, were delivered over a period of 6 months. Data were collected at baseline (before randomization), at 6 months, and at 12 months via a telephone interview.

RESULTS: At 12 months, there was a significant decrease noted in the hours per day of sedentary time in both the health coaching (−1.21; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], −1.71 to −0.70) and usual-care groups (−0.55; 95% CI, −1.06 to −0.05), but the between-group difference was not found to be statistically significant (−0.65; 95% CI, −1.37 to 0.06 [P = .07]). In stratified subgroup analyses, the multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have a significant effect on total sedentary time (hours/day) at 12 months in survivors of colorectal cancer who were aged > 60 years (−0.90; 95% CI, −1.80 to −0.01 [P = .05]), male (−1.33; 95% CI, −2.44 to −0.21 [P = .02]), and nonobese (−1.10; 95% CI, −1.96 to −0.25; [P = .01]).

CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating simple messages about limiting sedentary behaviors into a multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have modest effects on sedentary behavior. A sedentary behavior-specific intervention strategy may be required to achieve substantial changes in sedentary behavior among colorectal cancer survivors.

Item ID: 36171
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1097-0142
Keywords: sitting time, television, colorectal cancer, cancer survivorship, randomized controlled trial
Funders: Australian Government through Cancer Australia, National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Victorian Government, Canada Research Chairs Program
Projects and Grants: NHMRC Public Health Fellowship no. 586727
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2014 12:34
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111710 Health Counselling @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis > 111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920102 Cancer and Related Disorders @ 50%
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