Visceral adiposity is not associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm presence and growth

Cronin, Oliver, Liu, David, Bradshaw, Barbara, Iyer, Vikram, Buttner, Petra, Cunningham, Margaret, Walker, Philip J., and Golledge, Jonathan (2014) Visceral adiposity is not associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm presence and growth. Vascular Medicine, 19 (4). pp. 272-280.

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Abstract

Previous studies in rodent models and patients suggest that visceral adipose could play a direct role in the development and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). This study aimed to assess the association of visceral adiposity with AAA presence and growth. This study was a case-control investigation of patients that did (n=196) and did not (n=181) have an AAA who presented to The Townsville Hospital vascular clinic between 2003 and 2012. Cases were patients with AAA (infra-renal aortic diameter >30 mm) and controls were patients with intermittent claudication but no AAA (infra-renal aortic diameter <30 mm). All patients underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA). The visceral to total abdominal adipose volume ratio was estimated from CTAs by assessing total and visceral adipose deposits using an imaging software program. Measurements were assessed for reproducibility by repeat assessments on 15 patients. AAA risk factors were recorded at entry. Forty-five cases underwent two CTAs more than 6 months apart to assess AAA expansion. The association of visceral adiposity with AAA presence and growth was examined using logistic regression. Visceral adipose assessment by CTA was highly reproducible (mean coefficient of variation 1.0%). AAA was positively associated with older age and negatively associated with diabetes. The visceral to total abdominal adipose volume ratio was not significantly associated with AAA after adjustment for other risk factors. Patients with a visceral to total abdominal adipose volume ratio in quartile four had a 1.63-fold increased risk of AAA but with wide confidence intervals (95% CI 0.71-3.70; p=0.248). Visceral adiposity was not associated with AAA growth. In conclusion, this study suggests that visceral adiposity is not specifically associated with AAA presence or growth although larger studies are required to confirm these findings.

Item ID: 36133
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1477-0377
Keywords: abdominal aortic aneurysm, adiposity, obesity, visceral
Funders: BUPA Foundation, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC), Queensland Government
Projects and Grants: NHMRC 0540404, NHMRC 1003707, NHMRC 1000967, NHMRC Practitioner Fellowship 1019921
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2014 11:07
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology > 110201 Cardiology (incl Cardiovascular Diseases) @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases @ 100%
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