Exploring mechanisms of change: the relationships between cognitions, symptoms, and quality of life over the course of group cognitive-behaviour therapy

Oei, Tian Po S., McAlinden, Niamh M., and Cruwys, Tegan (2014) Exploring mechanisms of change: the relationships between cognitions, symptoms, and quality of life over the course of group cognitive-behaviour therapy. Journal of Affective Disorders, 168. pp. 72-77.

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Abstract

Background

This study aimed to explain how quality of life changes during psychotherapy, using a cognitive-behavioural theoretical framework, and examined whether changes in symptoms or changes in cognitions were more influential with regard to quality of life change. Three different hypotheses were tested that might explain the mechanisms by which quality of life changes during group cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) for anxiety and depression.

Methods

127 outpatients with anxiety and/or depression enrolled in a four-week group CBT programme participated. Measures of anxiety and depression symptoms, cognitive change, and quality of life were administered at baseline and post-treatment. Baseline to post-treatment change scores were calculated and entered into multiple regression analyses.

Results

Reductions in anxiety and depression symptoms were related to increases in quality of life, whereas cognitive changes were not consistently related to changes in quality of life.

Limitations

The main limitation was that the study' s design was not able to assess whether changes in cognitions or symptoms preceded changes in quality of life, as all variables were measured at the same two points in time.

Conclusions

These results provided evidence that quality of life changes as a result of or, simultaneously with, symptom change. It appears that group CBT does not improve quality of life through strategies designed to change patients' cognitions.

Item ID: 35995
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1573-2517
Keywords: anxiety, depression, mechanisms of change, cognitive theory, component analysis, psychotherapy
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2014 03:04
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9202 Health and Support Services > 920209 Mental Health Services @ 100%
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