An extra-domiciliary method for delivering entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae IP 46 against malaria vectors, Anopheles arabiensis

Lwetiojera, Dickson W., Sumaye, Robert D., Madumla, Edith P., Kavishe, Deogratius R., Mnyone, Ladslaus L., Russell, Tanya L., and Okumu, Fredros O. (2010) An extra-domiciliary method for delivering entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae IP 46 against malaria vectors, Anopheles arabiensis. Parasites & Vectors, 3.

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Abstract

Fungal biopesticides have the potential to significantly reduce densities of malaria vectors as well as associated malaria transmission. In previous field trials, entomopathogenic fungus was delivered from within human dwellings, where its efficacy was limited by low infection rates of target mosquitoes, high costs of spraying fungus inside houses, and potential public health concerns associated with introducing fungal conidia inside houses. Here we have demonstrated that Metarhizium anisopliae IP 46, delivered within an extra-domiciliary odor-baited station (OBS), can infect and slowly-kill a high proportion of the wild adult malaria vector, Anopheles arabiensis which entered and exited the OBS. This study, carried out in rural Tanzania, showed that by using a concentration of 3.9 × 1010 conidia/m2, more than 95% of mosquitoes that flew in and out of the OBS died within 14 days post-exposure. At least 86% infection of mosquito cadavers was recorded with a significant reduction in the probability of daily survival of exposed An. arabiensis in both treatments tested: low quantity of conidia (eave baffles plus one cotton panel; HR = 2.65, P < 0.0001) and high quantity of conidia (eave baffles plus two cotton panels; HR = 2.32, P < 0.0001). We conclude that high infection rates of entomopathogenic fungi on wild malaria vectors and possibly significant disruption of malaria transmission can be achieved if the fungus is delivered using optimally located outdoor odor-baited stations.

Item ID: 34740
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Additional Information:

© 2010 Lwetoijera et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

ISSN: 1756-3305
Funders: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF)
Projects and Grants: BMGF Grand Challenges Exploration Award Grant (code 15214)
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2014 04:40
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0608 Zoology > 060808 Invertebrate Biology @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920407 Health Protection and/or Disaster Response @ 50%
96 ENVIRONMENT > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960405 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species at Regional or Larger Scales @ 50%
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