Spatial and habitat-related patterns of temperate reef fish assemblages: implications for the design of Marine Protected Areas

Curley, Belinda G., Kingsford, Michael J., and Gillanders, Bronwyn M. (2002) Spatial and habitat-related patterns of temperate reef fish assemblages: implications for the design of Marine Protected Areas. Marine and Freshwater Research, 53 (8). pp. 1197-1210.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/MF01199
 
69
4


Abstract

Patterns of rocky reef fish assemblages (composition and relative abundance of species) were examined to provide data on the design of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), which aim to protect these organisms. A hierarchical design was used to investigate changes in fish assemblages at scales of metres to kilometres along-shore, and among reef habitat types within two 10-km areas on the central coast of New South Wales, Australia. Influences of physical and biological attributes of a reef on assemblages of fish were also examined. The greatest variation in fish assemblages occurred at scales of 2–6 km along-shore. Eighty percent of species recorded were found within a 6-km section of coastline. The most predictable differences in assemblages were found between reef habitats (urchin-grazed barrens, Ecklonia forest and sponge habitat), and between depths. Marine Protected Areas should ideally incorporate all available habitats over the entire depth range at which they occur. This may require MPAs larger than 2–6 km, or multiple MPAs that have been specifically located to include these features, as representation of habitats was found to vary at scales of kilometres to tens of kilometres along shore.

Item ID: 3459
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1448-6059
Date Deposited: 09 Jul 2009 23:57
Downloads: Total: 4
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page