Circadian variation of the acute and delayed response to alcohol: investigation of performance, physiological, and biochemical variations

Devaney, Madonna L. (2002) Circadian variation of the acute and delayed response to alcohol: investigation of performance, physiological, and biochemical variations. PhD thesis, James Cook University.

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Abstract

The overall aim of this thesis was to examine a range of measures with respect to alcohol administration time, in the same subjects using a controlled experimental design over an extended period of time. Evaluation and comparison of different systems simultaneously was undertaken in order to examine the chronokinetics and chronesthesy of alcohol. The aim of Study 1 was to ascertain whether a low or high dose of alcohol could be detected as interacting with time of day (1300 hr and 1800 hr) on performance of a dual task and subjective sleepiness. It was found that when a high dose of alcohol was ingested at 1300 hr, time off target on pursuit rotor under single and dual task conditions was higher than when alcohol was ingested at 1800 hr. There was no time of day variations in the BAC results. Study 2 aimed to further investigate the time of day effect found in Study 1. The aim of this study was to investigate time of day (1300 hr and 1800 hr) effects on biochemical (melatonin and cortisol) and physiological variables (temperature and heart rate) for no alcohol and alcohol conditions across the blood alcohol curve (0 - 5 hr post alcohol ingestion). Additionally, the pharmacokinetics of alcohol were explored for time of day variations. Results from Study 2 showed performance on a dual task and ratings of subjective states was not dependent on alcohol administration time. In contrast, core body temperature, heart rate and melatonin changes after alcohol ingestion appeared to be dependent on the time alcohol was ingested. Alcohol absorption rate was also found to be dependent on the time of day alcohol was ingested. Study 3, the second phase of study 2, aimed to investigate the delayed effects (5 hr - 14 hr post ingestion) of alcohol ingestion at two times of the day on core body temperature and subjective states. It was found that alcohol had statistically significant effects on the core body temperature and ratings of the subjective state of gregariousness 14 hr post alcohol ingestion. Of greatest consequence was the finding that regardless of when alcohol was ingested (1300 hr or 1800 hr), core body temperature was increased in comparison to a no alcohol condition from 2330 hr to 0830 hr (sleep phase).

Item ID: 34077
Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: alcohol absorption; alcohol metabolism; alcohol; BAC; biological clock; blood alcohol content; body temperature; circadian rhythm; heart rate; pharmacokinetics; sleep; sleepiness
Date Deposited: 21 Jul 2015 05:45
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology) @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920414 Substance Abuse @ 30%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health @ 70%
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