Fast demographic traits promote high diversification rates of Amazonian trees

Baker, Timothy R., Pennington, R. Toby, Magallon, Susana, Gloor, Emanuel, Laurance, William F., Alexiades, Miguel, Alvarez, Esteban, Araujo, Alejandro, Arets, Eric J.M.M., Aymard, Gerardo, Alves de Oliveira, Atila, Amaral, Iêda, Arroyo, Luzmila, Bonal, Damien, Brienen, Roel J.W., Chave, Jerome, Dexter, Kyle G., Di Fiore, Anthony, Eler, Eduardo, Feldpausch, Ted R., Ferreira, Leandro, Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela, van der Heijden, Geertje, Higuchi, Niro, Honorio, Eurídice, Huamantupa, Isau, Killeen, Tim J., Laurance, Susan, Leaño, Claudio, Lewis, Simon L., Malhi, Yadvinder, Marimon, Beatriz Schwantes, Marimon Junior, Ben Hur, Monteagudo Mendoza, Abel, Neill, David, Peñuela-Mora, Maria Cristina, Pitman, Nigel, Prieto, Adriana, Quesada, Carlos A., Ramírez, Fredy, Ramírez Angulo, Hirma, Rudas, Agustín, Ruschel, Ademir R., Salomão, Rafael P., Segalin de Andrade, Ana, Silva, J. Natalino M., Silveira, Marcos, Simon, Marcelo F., Spironello, Wilson, ter Steege, Hans, Terborgh, John, Toledo, Marisol, Torres-Lezama, Armando, Vásquez, Rodolfo, Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães, Vilanova, Emilio, Vos, Vincent A., and Phillips, Oliver L. (2014) Fast demographic traits promote high diversification rates of Amazonian trees. Ecology Letters, 17 (5). pp. 527-536.

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Abstract

The Amazon rain forest sustains the world's highest tree diversity, but it remains unclear why some clades of trees are hyperdiverse, whereas others are not. Using dated phylogenies, estimates of current species richness and trait and demographic data from a large network of forest plots, we show that fast demographic traits – short turnover times – are associated with high diversification rates across 51 clades of canopy trees. This relationship is robust to assuming that diversification rates are either constant or decline over time, and occurs in a wide range of Neotropical tree lineages. This finding reveals the crucial role of intrinsic, ecological variation among clades for understanding the origin of the remarkable diversity of Amazonian trees and forests.

Item ID: 33177
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1461-023X
Keywords: diversity; generation time; traits; tropical forest; turnover
Additional Information:

This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Funders: Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (GBMF), National Environmental Research Council (NERC), European Commission (EC), National Geographic Society, Tropenbos International, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), National Institute for Amazonian Research (INPA), Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network (TEAM), Conservation International, Missouri Botanical Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Wildlife Conservation Society, Agence Nationale pour la Recherche (ANR)
Projects and Grants: NERC grant number NE/I028122/1, NERC grant number NE/F005806/1, NASA Long-term Biosphere-Atmosphere Project in Amazonia, CNPq/PELD Sítio 15 Transição Cerrado – Floresta Amazônica (558069/2009-6), CNPq project INCT Processo 574008/2008-0, ANR CEBA: ANR-10-LABX-0025, ANR TULIP: ANR-10-LABX-0041
Date Deposited: 14 May 2014 09:51
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060208 Terrestrial Ecology @ 50%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0603 Evolutionary Biology > 060311 Speciation and Extinction @ 50%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960806 Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity @ 100%
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