Evaluating the Baby Basket program in north Queensland: as delivered by Apunipima Cape York Health Council, 2009 to 2013

McCalman, Janya, Searles, Andrew, Edmunds, Kim, Jongen, Crystal, Wargent, Rachael, Bainbridge, Roxanne, Ling, Rod, Tsey, Komla, and Doran, Chris (2014) Evaluating the Baby Basket program in north Queensland: as delivered by Apunipima Cape York Health Council, 2009 to 2013. Report. Lowitja Institute, Cairns, QLD, Australia.

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Abstract

[Extract] Indigenous Australians continue to have the poorest health outcomes of any group living in Australia. In Cape York, the northernmost region of Queensland with a large Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, maternal and child health (MCH) is particularly poor with high rates of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in comparison to the rest of Australia.[1] For maternal and child health, regular visits to health professionals (WHO recommends a minimum of four during pregnancy) reduces the risk of disease or complication due to early identification and treatment, as well as providing opportunities for education about healthy parenting behaviours such as good nutrition, alcohol and smoking cessation and the benefits of breast feeding.

In order to address the region’s poor maternal and child health, the Baby Basket program was developed by Apunipima Cape York Health Council (ACYHC), a community controlled Aboriginal health organization located in north Queensland (see Figure 1). The Baby Basket program was introduced in 2009. The program is an initiative focused on Indigenous women who are expecting a baby and/or have recently given birth. The program aims to engage Indigenous women with the health system through encouraging early and frequent attendance at antenatal and clinics and regular postnatal check-ups. Engagement is facilitated by the delivery of three Baby Baskets including five food vouchers to mothers. The baskets are delivered in the first trimester, immediately prior to birth and post birth. The program also attempts to improve knowledge about issues that affect the growing baby such as: healthy choices around smoking, alcohol and diet. Through enhanced engagement, the hypothesized impact of the Baby Basket program is better maternal health; reduced complications during and after pregnancy, an increased proportion of normal weight babies; and thriving infants. Ultimately, a healthy start to life should help reduce the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Item ID: 32801
Item Type: Report (Report)
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Prepared for The Lowitja Institute (project sponsor). Apunipima Cape York Health Council

Funders: The Lowitja Institute, Hunter Medical Research Institute , James Cook University
Date Deposited: 09 Nov 2016 01:45
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health @ 60%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111704 Community Child Health @ 40%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health @ 40%
92 HEALTH > 9203 Indigenous Health > 920303 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Health System Performance (incl. Effectiveness of Interventions) @ 60%
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