Diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep apnoea in Indigenous people in Central and Northern Australia

Woods, Cindy, Usher, Kim, Maguire, Graeme, Tikoft, Erik, and McPherson, Karen (2013) Diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep apnoea in Indigenous people in Central and Northern Australia. Annals of the Australasian College of Tropical Medicine, 14 (1). p. 15.

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Abstract

Background / Aims: There is currently no literature regarding diagnosis and management of sleep-related breathing disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Anecdotal experience suggests sleep-related breathing disorders are under diagnosed and variably managed in Central and Northern Australia. This study aimed to investigate the nature, risk factors and outcomes of people with sleep-related breathing disorders, and to compare and contrast severity, risk factors and management in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian patients.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 200 patients. Subjects were 50 consecutive Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients and 50 consecutive non-Indigenous patients who attended a Northern Queensland and Central Australian sleep clinic and were diagnosed with a sleep disorder. Retrospective data collected from patients’ medical records included demographics, co-morbidities, BMI, fatigue score, referral source, diagnosis and severity, and management details for 12 months following diagnosis.

Results: Aboriginal Australians in Central Australia were 2.3 times less likely to have a sleep disorder diagnosed compared with non-Indigenous Australians and Indigenous patients in Northern Australia were 2.9 times less likely to have a sleep disorder diagnosed compared with non-Indigenous patients. Indigenous patients were also twice as likely not to attend follow-up appointments in the 12 months following their diagnostic study (38%, 95% CI 27-49 compared with 19%, 11-30, p= 0.014).

Conclusion: sleep-related breathing disorders are a significant issue for regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. Potential barriers and enablers to care in this setting will be discussed.

Item ID: 31794
Item Type: Article (Abstract)
ISSN: 1448-4706
Date Deposited: 07 May 2014 01:43
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology > 110203 Respiratory Diseases @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9203 Indigenous Health > 920303 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Health System Performance (incl. Effectiveness of Interventions) @ 100%
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