Redclaw Crayfish

Jones, Clive (1998) Redclaw Crayfish. In: Hyde, K.W., (ed.) The New Rural Industries: A Handbook for Farmers and Investors. Rural Industries Research and​ Development Corporation, Canberra, ACT, Australia, pp. 127-133.

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Abstract

Redclaw, Cherax quadricarinatus, is a species of freshwater crayfish native to the rivers of north-west Queensland and the Northern Territory. Although well known to the locals of this isolated region of tropical Australia, it remained effectively unknown to the rest of Australia until the late 1980s. Redclaw is advantaged by a host of physical, biological and commercial attributes which make it an excellent candidate for aquaculture. It is a robust species with broad geographic potential, has a simple life-cycle and straight-forward production technology, requires simple foods and is economic to produce. The texture and flavour of the flesh compares very favourably with other commonly eaten marine crustaceans, and because it looks like a lobster, it is positioned at the premium end of the crustacean market spectrum. While current production at around 60 t/year is primarily marketed domestically, the growth potential for the industry lies with the substantial export demand for this product. Although a native Australian, redclaw’s excellent aquaculture attributes have seen it transplanted to several other countries where commercial production has been established. In the short-term this will be to Australia’s advantage in increasing the market profile of this new product. Longer term, Australia will maintain a production advantage based on access to the broad genetic pool of native stocks, sustainability due to thorough environmental regulations, and isolation from recognised diseases which have decimated off-shore industries. Redclaw aquaculture in Australia is poised for significant expansion. The basic resources of suitable land and water are readily available throughout northern Australia, and could potentially support production of several thousands of tonnes. The challenge for the industry is to increase production, through expansion and new investment, so as to lift production volumes to a point where the substantial quantities required by identified export markets can be consistently supplied. Production technologies, while still being developed, are at a stage where ‘best practice’ methods have been identified. These technologies are relatively straight-forward and the skill levels required of practitioners are not onerous. Supporting documentation and training are readily available.

Item ID: 31599
Item Type: Book Chapter (Non-Research)
ISBN: 978-0-642-24690-5
Keywords: redclaw, Cherax quadricarinatus, aquaculture
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Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2017 00:04
FoR Codes: 07 AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES > 0704 Fisheries Sciences > 070401 Aquaculture @ 100%
SEO Codes: 83 ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND ANIMAL PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 8301 Fisheries - Aquaculture > 830101 Aquaculture Crustaceans (excl. Rock Lobster and Prawns) @ 100%
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