Through the eyes of parents: a Singaporean perspective of the importance of cognitive and non-cognitive skills for six-year-old children

Carter, Margaret Anne, Chunn, Jennifer, and Frewen, Amie (2014) Through the eyes of parents: a Singaporean perspective of the importance of cognitive and non-cognitive skills for six-year-old children. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 39 (3). pp. 57-65.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://search.informit.com.au/documentSu...
 
6
6


Abstract

This study reports the importance 244 parents of six-year-old children living in Singapore placed on cognitive (problem-solving and creativity) and non-cognitive (practical school skills and conforming) behaviours. Our research team hypothesised that, as the age of the parent increased, the importance placed on each covariant skill (problem solving, creativity, practical, conformity) would differ. It was further hypothesised that the importance placed on cognitive skills compared with noncognitive skills for six-year-old children would decrease. Our results indicate that, when controlling for demographics, as parents aged they did place different levels of importance on each of the cognitive skills but not the non-cognitive skills. Furthermore, older parents placed less importance on cognitive compared with non-cognitive skills. The gap between average cognitive rating and average non-cognitive scores decreased as parents' age increased. This gap was found to be smaller for Chinese than non-Chinese parents. It decreased with age when controlling for child gender and parent ethnicity, gender and occupation.

Our results indicate that, when controlling for demographics, as parents aged they did place different levels of importance on each of the cognitive skills but not non-cognitive skills. Furthermore, older parents placed less importance on cognitive compared with non-cognitive skills. The gap between average cognitive rating and average non-cognitive scores decreased as parents’ age increased. This gap was found to be smaller for Chinese than non-Chinese parents. It decreased with age when controlling for child gender and parent ethnicity, gender and occupation.

Item ID: 30929
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1836-9391
Keywords: cognitive skills; non-cognitive skills; child rearing; young children
Funders: JCU Singapore internal grant
Date Deposited: 24 Oct 2014 20:29
FoR Codes: 13 EDUCATION > 1301 Education Systems > 130102 Early Childhood Education (excl Maori) @ 100%
SEO Codes: 93 EDUCATION AND TRAINING > 9301 Learner and Learning > 930103 Learner Development @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 6
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page