Environmental and economic costs of nonindigenous species in the United States

Pimentel, David, Lach, Lori, Zuniga, Rudolfo, and Morrison, Doug (2000) Environmental and economic costs of nonindigenous species in the United States. BioScience, 50 (1). pp. 53-65.

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Abstract

[Extract] Aproximately 50,000 nonindigenous (non-native) species are estimated to have been introduced to the United States. Some of these are beneficial; for example, species introduced as food crops (e.g., corn, wheat, and rice) and as livestock (e.g., cattle and poultry) now provide more than 98% of the US food system, at a value of approximately $800 billion per year (USBC 1998). Other exotic species have been introduced for landscape restoration, biological pest control, sport, pets, and food processing, also with significant benefits. Some nonindigenous species, however, have caused major economic losses in agriculture, forestry, and several other segments of the US economy, in addition to harming the environment. One study reported that 79 exotic species had caused approximately $97 billion in damages during the period 1906–1991 (OTA 1993).

Item ID: 30844
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1525-3244
Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2015 05:18
FoR Codes: 14 ECONOMICS > 1402 Applied Economics > 140205 Environment and Resource Economics @ 50%
05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0501 Ecological Applications > 050103 Invasive Species Ecology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960405 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species at Regional or Larger Scales @ 100%
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