The prevalence of potential pathogenic bacteria in nasopharyngeal samples from individuals with a respiratory tract infection and a sore throat: implications for the diagnosis of pharyngotonsillitis

Gunnarsson, Ronny K., Holm, Stig E., and Soderstrom, Margareta (2001) The prevalence of potential pathogenic bacteria in nasopharyngeal samples from individuals with a respiratory tract infection and a sore throat: implications for the diagnosis of pharyngotonsillitis. Family Practice, 18 (3). pp. 266-271.

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Abstract

Background. Treatment failure in patients with pharyngotonsillitis after a traditional course of penicillin V is a common finding. Several factors have been proposed to explain the failure rate, but the presence of aetiological agents other than group A β-haemolytic streptococci has attracted little attention.

Objectives. The aim of the present study was to investigate if a nasopharyngeal sample could suggest the aetiology of a sore throat in patients with a respiratory tract infection.

Methods. The prevalence of potentially pathogenic bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis) in nasopharyngeal samples from 618 healthy individuals was compared with that from 108 patients with a respiratory tract infection and a sore throat.

Results. The prevalence of H.influenzae was higher in patients with a sore throat than in healthy individuals of the same age. For the adult patients with a sore throat, the prevalence was 27.5% compared with 2.7% for the healthy carriers (P < 10–7). The corresponding figures for schoolchildren were 31.3% versus 6.1% (P = 0.004) and for pre-school children 37.8% versus 13.2% (P = 0.0003).

Conclusions. If H.influenzae is found in a nasopharyngeal sample from a patient with a respiratory tract infection and a sore throat, it might be the aetiological agent.

Item ID: 30777
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1460-2229
Keywords:
Date Deposited: 24 Feb 2014 02:42
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110303 Clinical Microbiology @ 20%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110309 Infectious Diseases @ 30%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111717 Primary Health Care @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920109 Infectious Diseases @ 40%
92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920115 Respiratory System and Diseases (incl. Asthma) @ 20%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920404 Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response) @ 40%
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