Towards a systematic framework for analysis of interdisciplinary tools and approaches in biodiversity conservation

Hill, Rosemary, Gordon, Iain, Cullen-Unsworth, Leanne, Williams, Kristen, and Dale, Allan (2011) Towards a systematic framework for analysis of interdisciplinary tools and approaches in biodiversity conservation. In: Presentations from the 6th International Conference on Environmental Future. From: 6th International Conference on Environmental Future, 18-22 July 2011, Newcastle, UK. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background: Conservation of Australia's globally-significant tropical forest biodiversity presents complex social-ecological system challenges at the intersection of Indigenous, local and scientific knowledge systems. Interdisciplinary research has been central in creating the integrated understanding necessary to address these challenges. A wide range of collaborative techniques have been adapted to bring multiple disciplines to bear and integrate their findings. Dynamic systems modelling, participatory spatial analysis, scenario generation and action co-research methods have been deployed for landscape-scale approaches. Collaborative research with Indigenous peoples has utilised agreed protocols and governance arrangements. More recently, human relationship management within a place-based learning community has been identified as critical for integration with Indigenous knowledge systems. Nevertheless, identification and justification of the particular forms and tools suited to specific questions and contexts remains a significant challenge for interdisciplinary research. Content: We present an analysis of our diverse experiences in interdisciplinary science, using a sociological scaffolding of four elements: epistemology; theoretical perspective; methodology and methods. This framework provides a systematic means of relating interdisciplinary tools and approaches to specific characteristics of the research context, including the degree of disciplinary integration and involvement of non-academic participants. Epistemological concerns are identified as key to knowledge integration amongst science and society, particularly when Indigenous knowledge systems are engaged. Implications: Further development and testing of our analytical framework will help to identify and justify appropriate forms and tools for interdisciplinary engagement in diverse research contexts.

Item ID: 30049
Item Type: Conference Item (Presentation)
Keywords: interdisciplinary; epistemeology; methodology
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Date Deposited: 01 Oct 2014 03:29
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity @ 50%
05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050201 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Knowledge @ 50%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9605 Ecosystem Assessment and Management > 960501 Ecosystem Assessment and Management at Regional or Larger Scales @ 50%
96 ENVIRONMENT > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960805 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity at Regional or Larger Scales @ 50%
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