Annual cycles of Frankliella spp. (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) thrips abundance on North Florida uncultivated reproductive hosts: Predicting possible sources of pest outbreaks

Northfield, Tobin D., Paini, Dean R., Funderburk, Joe E., and Reitz, Stuart R. (2008) Annual cycles of Frankliella spp. (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) thrips abundance on North Florida uncultivated reproductive hosts: Predicting possible sources of pest outbreaks. Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 101 (4). pp. 769-778.

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Abstract

Frankliniella spp. (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) thrips damage a variety of crops, feed on a broad range of hosts, and often migrate into cropping systems from adjacent vegetation. To determine potential sources of Frankliniella spp. thrips on crops, annual cycles of abundance of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), Frankliniella fusca (Hinds), Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan), and Frankliniella tritici (Fitch) were evaluated on seven common, uncultivated reproductive hosts. These hosts included Raphanus raphanistrum L., Rubus trivialis Michx., Rubus cuneifolius Pursh., Vicia sativa L., Trifolium repens L., Solidago canadensis L. and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Thrips were collected from R. cuneifolius, and T. repens in the spring, R. raphanistrum in the summer, and C. ambrosioides and S. canadensis in the fall. The most common Frankliniella species on every plant species was F. tritici, and a fifth species, Pseudothrips inequalis (Beach), was collected in the fall on C. ambrosioides and S. canadensis. All thrips species were highly aggregated in the flowers or flower racemes, rather than leaves or fruit, and they were generally only collected from flowering plants. R. raphanistrum supported large populations, and they may be an important link for thrips between spring and fall. In addition, it may be an essentially enemy free host, as only one O. insidiosus, an important thrips predator, was collected from this host. S. canadensis also supported large thrips populations in the fall, and it may be a source of thrips migrating into crops the following spring. Controlling thrips on these hosts in their respective seasons may limit the number migrating into cropping systems.

Item ID: 28461
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1938-2901
Date Deposited: 15 Aug 2013 02:30
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060207 Population Ecology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960413 Control of Plant Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland @ 100%
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