Short-term retrospective versus prospective memory processing as emergent properties of the mind and brain: human fMRI evidence

Mok, L.W. (2012) Short-term retrospective versus prospective memory processing as emergent properties of the mind and brain: human fMRI evidence. Neuroscience, 226. pp. 236-252.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience...
 
11
3


Abstract

The functional-neuroanatomical substrates for short-term retrospective versus prospective memory processing were examined in a delay task, in which associative choices were made conditionally based on the presenting discriminative/cue stimulus. Delay-period prospection could be of the intended choice and/or the expected response outcome, whereas delay-period retrospection would be of the just-presented cue stimulus. Previous results have shown that the spontaneous process of unique outcome prospection did not implicate the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) but instead implicated the lateral posterior parietal cortex (LPPC) in a modality-independent fashion (Mok et al., 2009). Spontaneous retrospection was more dependent on the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Nevertheless, it was anticipated that the more explicit process of prospecting an intended choice would implicate the lateral PFC. To verify this, Mok et al.'s data were further analyzed, with new control data. Healthy, young adults performed delayed discriminative choices under procedures that biased them toward different degrees of delay-period prospection: higher—using cue-unique, differential outcomes (DO); versus lower—using a non-unique, common outcome (CO), or unpredictable, non-differential outcomes (NDO). Experimental participants performed the DO versus CO procedures concurrently, while undergoing event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Separately, control participants provided data for: the NDO condition; related comparison tasks, which biased them toward different degrees of delay-period retrospection; and null-event trials. Expectedly, the more explicit process of prospecting an intended associative choice implicated the lateral PFC, as part of and together with other components of the multiple-demand network. Comparisons against null-event trials indicated that the sustained delay activity observed in MTL and LPPC, respectively, was part of default brain activity. These results demonstrated that short-term retrospection and prospection may emerge without necessarily relying on working memory-specific brain networks. Furthermore, attention may not necessarily be recruited to realize working memory. When cognitive processes are spontaneously experienced, they may be facilitated by the default brain network.

Item ID: 24876
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1873-7544
Keywords: working memory, multiple-demand network, default brain network, spontaneous cognition, retrospection, prospection
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2013 23:08
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1702 Cognitive Science > 170205 Neurocognitive Patterns and Neural Networks @ 40%
17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology) @ 60%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 3
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page