Retirement attitude and unknown caregiving roles: findings from the Australian baby boom career women national survey

Courtney, L., Caltabiano, N., and Caltabiano, M. (2012) Retirement attitude and unknown caregiving roles: findings from the Australian baby boom career women national survey. In: Abstracts from the International Psychogeriatric Association International Meeting. p. 122. From: IPA 2012: International Psychogeriatric Association International Meeting, 7-11 September 2012, Cairns, QLD, Australia.

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Abstract

Background: Baby boom women (people born from 1946 to 1964) are reaching retirement age; however, they have experienced a very different life course than previous generations. Social and economic changes for baby boom women (e.g., the enormous growth of women in the workforce, single-parent families) reflect their multiple roles and identities. Baby boomers are also living longer than previous generations, which has resulted in baby boom women having more active, multi-generational caregiving roles (e.g., caring for spouse, parents, grandparents, grandchildren) (Blieszer, 2009). In order to ensure that baby boom career women have optimal work and retirement trajectories or transitions in later life, it is crucial to examine factors that contribute towards their view of retirement.

Aim: The aim of this research was to investigate Australian baby boom career women's attitude towards retirement, the differential effect of unknown caregiving roles, and marital status.

Method: This paper reports findings from 1,051 women who participated in the Australia Baby Boom Career Women national survey. Previous research has found cohort differences between early baby boomers (EBBs) (born from 1946 to 1955) and late baby boomers (LBBs) (born from 1955 to 1964); therefore, this paper includes EBB/LBB comparisons. Attitude towards retirement was determined by a forced-response question (positive, negative, undecided); marital status was derived from demographics. A forced-response survey question, "Are you concerned about unknown caregiving roles in your retirement years?" was rated on an 11-point scale (strongly disagree to strongly agree).

Findings and Conclusion: Results revealed that EBBs were significantly more concerned about unknown caregiving roles than LBBs and EBBs who reported a positive or undecided attitude towards retirement were the respondents who were significantly more concerned about unknown caregiving roles. Additionally, married/de facto EBBs were significantly more concerned about unknown caregiving roles than single women. Explanations for these findings will be discussed along with implications and recommendations.

Item ID: 23604
Item Type: Conference Item (Abstract / Summary)
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Date Deposited: 26 Aug 2015 23:16
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920502 Health Related to Ageing @ 100%
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