Coral farming as means of sustaining livelihoods and promoting resource management

Wia, Jane, Januchowski-Hartley, Fraser, Lahari, Rachael U., Morove, Tau, Perks, Helen M., and Holmes, Katherine E. (2012) Coral farming as means of sustaining livelihoods and promoting resource management. In: Proceedings of the 12th International Coral Reef Symposium, pp. 1-5. From: 12th International Coral Reef Symposium, 9-13 July 2012, Cairns, QLD, Australia.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Download (355kB)
View at Publisher Website: http://www.icrs2012.com/proceedings/manu...
 
142


Abstract

With the ongoing transition between the barter and the cash economy in Papua New Guinea (PNG), traditional resource production and exploitation must adapt to the changing markets. The increasing demands for goods and services have resulted in coastal and marine resources in PNG showing signs of overexploitation. Andra Island in Manus Province is one of many islands whose inhabitants are highly dependent on the sea for sustenance and livelihoods. Ecological studies by the Wildlife Conservation Society have revealed that the surrounding reefs are denuded of branching Acropora corals compared with similar sites in Manus and elsewhere. This is likely to be due to the island’s economic dependence on the harvest of Acropora corals for the coral lime trade. Lime (calcium hydroxide) is chewed with betelnut (Areca catechu) throughout most coastal regions of PNG, and Andra has a monopoly on the lime trade in Manus. A coral farming project was implemented with the aim of providing a sustainable means of maintaining the coral lime trade. Unlike other coral farming projects in the Pacific, this project operates completely at the local scale and is not reliant on overseas markets; nor does it face the logistical challenges of the aquarium trade. We assess here the degree to which the coral farming activities contribute to livelihoods while relieving extractive pressure on reefs. The project has potential to expand throughout other regions of PNG where corals are harvested for lime.

Item ID: 22401
Item Type: Conference Item (Refereed Research Paper - E1)
Keywords: coral farming, betel nut, Acropora
Additional Information:

© Copyright belongs to the authors.

Related URLs:
ISBN: 978-0-9808572-5-2
Date Deposited: 11 Sep 2012 04:45
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050209 Natural Resource Management @ 50%
16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1608 Sociology > 160802 Environmental Sociology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9605 Ecosystem Assessment and Management > 960506 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Fresh, Ground and Surface Water Environments @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 142
Last 12 Months: 2
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page