Manipulation of glycemic response with isomaltulose in a milk-based drink does not affect cognitive performance in healthy adults

Dye, Louise, Gilsenan, Mary B., Quadt, Frits, Martens, Vanessa E. G., Bot, Arjen, Lasikiewicz, Nicola, Camidge, Diana, Croden, Fiona, and Lawton, Clare (2010) Manipulation of glycemic response with isomaltulose in a milk-based drink does not affect cognitive performance in healthy adults. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 54 (4). pp. 506-515.

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Abstract

Previous research suggests that glucoregulation and nutrient interventions, which alter circulating glucose, impact cognitive function. To examine the effect of modulating glycemic response using isomaltulose on cognitive function 24 healthy male adult participants consumed energy and macronutrient-matched milk-based drinks containing 50 g isomaltulose, 50 g sucrose or a water control in a counterbalanced within-subject design. Interstitial glucose was measured continuously in 12 subjects and all provided 9 capillary measures on each test day. A 30-min cognitive test battery was administered before and twice (+35 and +115 min) after drink ingestion. Immediate, delayed, recognition, verbal and working memory, and psychomotor performance were assessed. Glycemic profiles induced by the drinks differed significantly during the first but not the second post-drink test battery. Neither administration of the sucrose nor isomaltulose drinks produced consistent effects on verbal or working memory, or psychomotor performance. This study used isomaltulose as an investigative tool to lower glycemic response. Importantly, it demonstrates a lack of effect of modulating glucose on cognitive performance based on reliable, continuously measured glycemia. It refutes the hypothesis that glycemia is associated with cognitive performance and questions the suggestion that isomaltulose has an effect on cognitive performance.

Item ID: 21998
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1613-4133
Keywords: cognitive function; glycemic response; isomaltulose; memory; psychomotor
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2012 04:53
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology) @ 60%
17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1702 Cognitive Science > 170201 Computer Perception, Memory and Attention @ 40%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920411 Nutrition @ 60%
97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences @ 40%
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