From sarong to kaba: Javanese batik and African garments

Wrońska-Friend, Maria (2010) From sarong to kaba: Javanese batik and African garments. In: Proceedings of the ICOM Costume Committee: Costume and the Textile Trade. Textiles et Costumes, Echanges Commerciaux, pp. 110-117. From: ICOM Costume Committee: Costume and the Textile Trade. Textiles et Costumes, Echanges Commerciaux, 4 - 9 October 2009, Lyon, France.

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Abstract

[Extract] In 1812 Th. S. Raffles in his role as the Governor of Java, sent the British textile producers a series of Javanese batik garments with a request to print copies of these- fabrics that could be sold to the lower strata of the Javanese society. In spite of on initial failure, in the following years the project proved to be quite successful. In the first half of the 19th century numerous factories not only in the UK but also in the Netherlands, Belgium and Switzerland supplied annually hundreds of thousands of cheap garments for the fast growing population of Java and Malay Peninsula. However, from around 1860s, with the introduction of the copper stamp cop to the wax application, Java became self-sufficient in garment production and European producers started 10 lose this profitable market.

Rather than changing the complex technology of resist-printing, European manufacturers found a new market in countries of West Africa. By the end of the 19th century, almost all European factories specialising in batik imitations shifted their trade from Java to Africa. Over the time, the Javanese motifs as well as the technology of resist-dyeing have undergone a significant transformation, gradually being adapted to the African aesthetics and market demands. In spile of this process, the Javanese origin is of numerous designs of contemporary African garments are still dearly recognizable, providing further evidence that textiles are one of the most effective vehicles of cross-cultural transmission.

Item ID: 16915
Item Type: Conference Item (Non-Refereed Research Paper)
Keywords: textiles Indonesia, textiles Africa, cross-cultural connections
ISBN: 978-2-35740-057-3
Date Deposited: 08 Feb 2012 03:51
FoR Codes: 16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1601 Anthropology > 160104 Social and Cultural Anthropology @ 40%
16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1699 Other Studies in Human Society > 169903 Studies of Asian Society @ 40%
19 STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING > 1905 Visual Arts and Crafts > 190599 Visual Arts and Crafts not elsewhere classified @ 20%
SEO Codes: 95 CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING > 9599 Other Cultural Understanding > 959999 Cultural Understanding not elsewhere classified @ 60%
95 CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING > 9505 Understanding Past Societies > 950502 Understanding Asias Past @ 40%
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