Expression of Catenin family members CTNNA1, CTNNA2, CTNNB1 and JUP in the primate prefrontal cortex and hippocampus

Smith, A., Bourdeau, I., Wang, J., and Bondy, C.A. (2005) Expression of Catenin family members CTNNA1, CTNNA2, CTNNB1 and JUP in the primate prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Molecular Brain Research, 135 (1-2). pp. 225-231.

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Abstract

Members of the catenin family of proteins are thought to play a major role in the folding and lamination of the cerebral cortex. We have used in situ hybridization to determine the cellular expression patterns of four members of this family, Alpha-E-, Alpha-N-, Beta-, and Gamma-catenins (CTNNA1, CTNNA2, CTNNB1, and JUP respectively) in the adult primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and hippocampus. CTNNA2, CTNNB1, and JUP mRNAs were detected in all layers of the DLPFC and in all neuronal subregions of the hippocampal formation, however CTNNA1 mRNA, coding for an ‘epithelial’ specific catenin, was not detected in any region of the cortex or hippocampus. CTNNA2, a ‘neuronal-specific’ catenin, and CTNNB1 mRNAs were abundant in both DLPFC and hippocampus, with a distinct neuronal localization. CTNNA2 mRNA was concentrated in both granular/stellate cells and large pyramidal cell bodies, while CTNNB1 expression was more strongly associated with granular cell bodies throughout the DLPFC, with expression in pyramidal cells confined mainly to cortical Layers III and VI. CTNNA2 and CTNNB1 mRNAs were also abundant in the granule cells of the dentate gyrus and pyramidal cells of Ammon's horn, apparently co-expressed in the same neurons. JUP mRNA was rather diffusely localized in the DLPFC without the distinct laminar patterns seen for CTNNA2 and CTNNB1 but was distinctly localized in the granule cells of the dentate gyrus and pyramidal cells of Ammon's horn. These studies demonstrate a distinct neuronal pattern of gene expression for catenin family members in primate brain structures characterized by high degrees of folding and strong lamination. The high level expression of these transcripts supports the notion of a major role for catenins even in the adult brain. Such an understanding is also important in view of the multiple interactions that catenins have with many other proteins in the adult and ageing brain. This may also have implications for understanding the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, as well as emerging neuronal stem cell therapies.

Item ID: 9676
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: prefrontal cortex; Hippocampus; Pyramidal neuron; Rhesus monkey
ISSN: 1872-6941
Date Deposited: 29 Mar 2010 03:21
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1109 Neurosciences > 110903 Central Nervous System @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920111 Nervous System and Disorders @ 100%
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