Could a vegetarian diet reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress? A review of the literature

Trapp, Denise, Knez, Wade, and Sinclair, Wade (2010) Could a vegetarian diet reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress? A review of the literature. Journal of Sports Sciences, 28 (12). pp. 1261-1268.

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Abstract

Oxidative stress is a natural physiological process that describes an imbalance between free radical production and the ability of the antioxidant defence system of the body to neutralize free radicals. Free radicals can be beneficial as they may promote wound healing and contribute to a healthy immune response. However, free radicals can have a detrimental impact when they interfere with the regulation of apoptosis and thus play a role in the promotion of some cancers and conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Antioxidants are molecules that reduce the damage associated with oxidative stress by counteracting free radicals. Regular exercise is a vital component of a healthy lifestyle, although it can increase oxidative stress. As a typical vegetarian diet comprises a wide range of antioxidant-rich foods, it is plausible that the consumption of these foods will result in an enhanced antioxidant system capable of reducing exercise-induced oxidative stress. In addition, a relationship between a vegetarian diet and lower risks of cardiovascular disease and some cancers has been established. This review explores the current available evidence linking exercise, vegetarians, antioxidants, and oxidative stress.

Item ID: 8254
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
ISSN: 1466-447X
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2010 05:07
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics > 111101 Clinical and Sports Nutrition @ 80%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology @ 20%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920411 Nutrition @ 50%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 5
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