Adoption: a different road to mothering. Adoptive mothers’ experiences of negotiating and maintaining the mothering role at significant points across the adoption life cycle

Gair, Susan (1996) Adoption: a different road to mothering. Adoptive mothers’ experiences of negotiating and maintaining the mothering role at significant points across the adoption life cycle. PhD thesis, James Cook University.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Thesis: Front Pages; Parts 1-3) - Submitted Version
Download (11Mb)
[img]
Preview
PDF (Thesis: Parts 4-5 ; References; Appendices) - Submitted Version
Download (10Mb)

Abstract

Adoptive mothers are important, yet often hidden members of the adoption circle. They are also a unique group of mothers. The research presented in this thesis involved the participation of fifty adoptive mothers. Presented in their own terms are their experiences as they traverse a different road to mothering and as they experience the many similarities to, and many differences from other women engaged in the role of mother. Significant points across the adoption life cycle were examined. In order to gather rich and meaningful data on a range of adoptive mothers. experiences and emotions, two semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with the participants. To extend and complement the qualitative data on the range of experiences and emotions experienced in adoptive motherhood, including the early post adoption mothering period, three objective measures were introduced. These were the Social Readjustment Scale (Holmes and Rahe Life Event Scale), the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, and the Interview Schedule for Social Interaction. What was envisaged was a presentation of adoption from the little researched perspective of adoptive mothers; a united voice presenting a different perspective on adoption and on mothering. However the wide ranging, unique, individual, complex and dynamic nature of the experiences of adoptive mothers in Queensland presents both identifiable similarities, and an unexpectedly rich diversity of experience. The findings from this research, and the conclusions drawn, have important implications for social work practice in the area of adoption and for adoption policy, service delivery and future research. In particular, the contribution made to the theoretical social work knowledge base with reference to adoption practice is of importance.

Additionally, the experiences of adoptive mothers revealed in this study suggest that this research can also offer insight for informed social work practice with many mothers in this society.

Item ID: 7903
Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: adoption, adoption cycle, mothering roles, adoptive mothers, mothering experiences
Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2010 05:49
FoR Codes: 16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1607 Social Work > 160799 Social Work not elsewhere classified @ 50%
16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1601 Anthropology > 160104 Social and Cultural Anthropology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 94 LAW, POLITICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES > 9401 Community Service (excl. Work) > 940112 Families and Family Services @ 50%
97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society @ 50%
Downloads: Total: 783
Last 12 Months: 24
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page