Australian baby boom career women reject 'retirement' and embrace 're-evolvement'

Courtney, Lyn, Caltabiano, Nerina , and Caltabiano, Marie (2008) Australian baby boom career women reject 'retirement' and embrace 're-evolvement'. In: Proceedings of 43rd Australian Psychological Society (APS) annual conference: psychology leading change , pp. 135-139. From: 43rd Australian Psychological Society (APS) Annual Conference: Psychology Leading Change, 23-27 September 2008, Hobart, TAS, Australia.

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Abstract

The purpose of this research was to investigate if retirement expectations and subjective wellbeing of Australian baby boom career women differ for age, marital status and employment status. This paper reports some major findings from a national survey comprised of 1052 baby boom women. Sixty-three percent of baby boom career women who responded to the open-ended question, "Do you have retirement plans?" stated expectations that their post-career years would consist of paid and/or volunteer work. Thirty-two percent of women respondents planned extensive travel or had educational aspirations in their post-career years. These results suggest that baby boom career women reject the traditional concept of 'retirement'. Results from two MANOVAs were statistically significant. First, early baby boomers (EBBs), women born from 1946 to 1954, were significantly more satisfied with life overall and had higher achievement expectations than late baby boomers (LBBs), women born from 1955 to 1964. Second, married baby boom career women were significantly more salisfied with life overall than single baby boom career women. There was no significant difference for employment status.

Item ID: 7819
Item Type: Conference Item (Refereed Research Paper - E1)
Keywords: baby boomers; successful ageing; women; retirement issues; quality of life
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ISBN: 973-0-909881-36-8
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2010 05:40
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170113 Social and Community Psychology @ 60%
17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology @ 40%
SEO Codes: 94 LAW, POLITICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES > 9405 Work and Institutional Development > 940501 Employment Patterns and Change @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920502 Health Related to Ageing @ 25%
92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920507 Womens Health @ 25%
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