Attachment style, perceived social support and health behaviour

Jakabek, David, and Caltabiano, Marie L. (2008) Attachment style, perceived social support and health behaviour. In: Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group, pp. 27-32. From: 8th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group, 15-16 November 2008, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

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Abstract

This study examined the relationship between attachment style, satisfaction with social support and the practise of health behaviours versus risk behaviours. There were 105 respondents (31 male, 74 female) who participated in the study. Attachment was assessed using the Relationship Styles Questionnaire. Health promoting and risk behaviours were assessed across the domains of exercise, smoking, drinking, drug use, hygiene, diet, driving and sexual behaviour. Satisfaction with social support was measured using the Social Support Questionnaire. Attachment was not significantly associated with risk behaviours. Regression analyses found main effects for secure (beta = .243), fearful (beta = -.263) and dismissing (beta = -.267) attachment styles on the practise of health promoting behaviours, indicating that those with a fearful or dismissing attachment style were less likely to practise health behaviours. Secure, fearful and preoccupied attachment styles were significantly linked to satisfaction with social support, those with fearful and preoccupied attachment being less satisfied with the support received. Satisfaction with social support was associated with the practise of more health behaviours. Using bootstrapping techniques, satisfaction with social support significantly mediated the influence of secure and fearful attachment style on health behaviour. Findings have implications for the provision of support interventions for those with insecure attachment to enhance health-promoting behaviours.

Item ID: 7564
Item Type: Conference Item (Refereed Research Paper - E1)
Keywords: health behavior; attachment; social support; young adults
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ISBN: 978-0-909881-38-2
Date Deposited: 08 May 2010 02:45
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology @ 50%
17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health @ 60%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920413 Social Structure and Health @ 10%
92 HEALTH > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified @ 30%
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