Predicting changes in eating disorder symptoms among Chinese adolescents: a 9-month prospective study

Jackson, Todd, and Chen, Hong (2008) Predicting changes in eating disorder symptoms among Chinese adolescents: a 9-month prospective study. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 64 (1). pp. 87-95.

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Abstract

Objectives: Body image and eating disturbances have become global phenomena, yet prospective designs have rarely been employed in research on non-Western samples. This study tested the extent to which select features of the dual-pathway account of bulimic disturbances contributed to changes in eating disorder symptoms reported among adolescents from China.

Methods: A sample of 593 Chinese middle school and high school students (217 boys, 376 girls) completed measures of eating disorder symptoms, body image concerns, internalized physical appearance ideals, negative affect, and appearance-based social pressure, teasing, and comparison and returned 9 months later to complete the same measures.

Results: For both girls and boys, increases in eating disorder symptoms between Times 1 and 2 were predicted by higher baseline levels of fatness concern and perceived social pressure. Among the girls, negative affect also contributed marginally to changes in eating disorder symptoms.

Conclusions: Findings suggest specific risk factors including personal concerns about being fat and negative social feedback about physical appearance, may help to explain changes in eating disturbances of adolescents over time and across specific cultures.

Item ID: 6666
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: eating disorders; predictors; China; longitundinal; sociocultural; body dissatisfaction; adolescents; gender
ISSN: 0022-3999
Date Deposited: 08 Feb 2010 04:42
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology @ 80%
17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing @ 20%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health @ 100%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 14
Downloads: Total: 1
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