Hepatitis B sero-conversion following immunisation among a cohort of rural Australian health care workers

Smith, Derek R., Porter, Julie, Leggat, Peter A., and Wang, Rui-Sheng (2005) Hepatitis B sero-conversion following immunisation among a cohort of rural Australian health care workers. Journal of Occupational Safety and Health, 2 (1). pp. 17-19.

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Abstract

Although vaccination against Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is highly effective in preventing occupational transmission among health care workers, not all people develop protective immunity. Furthermore, little is known about sero-conversion in rural areas. We investigated the serology of Anti HBV Surface Antigens (Anti-HBs) among staff at a regional health facility in Queensland, Australia between 1998 and 2000. Anti-HBs concentrations were divided into four categories (<10, 10 to 499, 500 to 999, ≥ 1000 mIUmL), with <10 mIUmL considered unprotected. Statistical analysis was conducted by intention to treat. At baseline, 91.8% of staff were found to be unprotected against HBV. After the first vaccination, this level had dropped to 44.3% and further to 9.8% by the second schedule. However, after 3 vaccinations, 1.6% of the original group still had Anti-HBs levels below 10 mIUmL and thus, remained unprotected. Overall, this study has shown that Anti-HBs levels among rural cohorts can be increased by multiple booster vaccinations. Nevertheless, HBV vaccine was not 100% effective, even after 3 doses. Vaccination against HBV is an important occupational consideration in many areas of health care. Nevertheless, as a certain percentage of individuals in rural areas do not successfully sero-convert, alternative vaccination strategies may need to be considered.

Item ID: 6646
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: epidemiology; Hepatitis; occupational health; seroconversion; staff; Heppatitis B Virus; regional; vaccination; Australia
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ISSN: 1675-5456
Date Deposited: 05 Feb 2010 04:55
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920404 Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response) @ 51%
92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920504 Occupational Health @ 49%
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