Selectivity in vector management: an investigation of the effectiveness of measures used to prevent transport of non-indigenous species

Floerl, Oliver, Inglis, Graeme J., and Marsh, Helene M. (2005) Selectivity in vector management: an investigation of the effectiveness of measures used to prevent transport of non-indigenous species. Biological Invasions, 7 (3). pp. 459-475.

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Abstract

Measures taken to control the spread of non-indigenous species by human vectors may act selectively by providing effective protection against some (but not all) species. Toxic 'antifouling paints' are used by boat owners to prevent the development of 'fouling assemblages' on the hulls of their boats, which reduce vessel speed and maneuverability. By reducing fouling, these paints also prevent transport of non-indigenous species. Using experimental surfaces mimicking boat hulls, we evaluated the effectiveness and selectivity of (1) antifouling paints, and (2) manual, in-water hull cleaning for preventing the transport of marine sessile invertebrates by recreational vessels. Different types of antifouling paints provided effective protection only against barnacles and bivalves. Other fouling taxa occurred on experimental surfaces after a period of only 2 months. Manual hull cleaning did not remove fouling completely, and even enhanced the risk of subsequent recruitment by some fouling organisms. Up to six times more individuals and colonies recruited to boat surfaces from which the existing fouling organisms had been removed manually than to surfaces that had been sterilized or contained intact fouling assemblages. Bivalves, colonial and solitary ascidians, encrusting bryozoans, hydroids, tubiculous polychaetes, and sponges consistently recruited in greatest abundance to manually cleaned surfaces. Individual taxa responded in complex, but predictable ways to the biogenic cues left by manual cleaning, so that different suites of organisms colonized surfaces that had originally contained fouling assemblages of local or non-local origin. Our study shows that widely adopted measures to control the spread of non-indigenous species by human vectors are often highly selective and, while effective for some taxa, do not prevent the transport of others.

Item ID: 6016
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: antifouling paints; marinas; vector management; hull fouling; maintenance; post-invasion spread; recreational vessels
ISSN: 1573-1464
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2010 03:57
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified @ 50%
05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050211 Wildlife and Habitat Management @ 25%
05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050204 Environmental Impact Assessment @ 25%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960407 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Marine Environments @ 100%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 18
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