Suicide rates and antidepressant prescribing: a casual or causal relationship

Baune, Bernhard, and Hay, Phillipa (2006) Suicide rates and antidepressant prescribing: a casual or causal relationship. PLoS Medicine, 3 (6). pp. 734-735.

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Abstract

In an ecological study in this issue of PLoS Medicine, Milane and colleagues found a temporal association between prescription of specific serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants and suicide rates in the United States [1]. Their study addresses a subject of great public health importance and clinical interest. The researchers asked the question: was the use of antidepressants associated with a change in suicide rates in the general population of the United States between 1988 and 2002? There were two underlying hypotheses: (1) antidepressants can trigger suicide and subsequently increase suicide rates, and (2) through the treatment of depression with antidepressants, suicide rates decline over time.

Item ID: 4120
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: suicide rates; depression; drug therapy; Fluoxetine; adverse effects
ISSN: 1549-1676
Date Deposited: 30 Oct 2009 01:55
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111714 Mental Health @ 34%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy) @ 33%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified @ 33%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920410 Mental Health @ 51%
92 HEALTH > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified @ 49%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 2
Downloads: Total: 3
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