Relationships between perceived close social support and health practices within community samples of American women and men

Jackson, Todd (2006) Relationships between perceived close social support and health practices within community samples of American women and men. Journal of Psychology, 140 (3). pp. 229-246.

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Abstract

In this cross-sectional study the author examined the impact of perceived social support from close interpersonal relationships (e.g., significant other, family, and friends) on health practices in community samples of women and men. Research volunteers (N = 373; 189 women, 184 men) from the Northern Wisconsin region completed self-report measures of social support, depression, hassles, health practices (i.e., diet, exercise, relations with health professionals, substance abuse, sleep), and demographic information. After controlling statistically for sociodemographic factors, the authors found that depressive symptoms, hassles, and perceived social support contributed significantly to the prediction of healthy diet and adherence to routine medical attention for women, but not for men. The author also observed for relations between perceived close support and (a) exercise and (b) substance abuse among women. Findings suggest that high levels of social support from one's close social network contribute independently to specific health practices for women, but not for men, and point to the importance of both between- and within-gender assessment of health behavior.

Item ID: 3956
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: gender, health practices, social support
ISSN: 0022-3980
Date Deposited: 23 Nov 2009 05:24
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences @ 100%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 19
Downloads: Total: 4
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