Pedometer Accuracy during walking over different surfaces

Leicht, Anthony S., and Crowther, Robert G. (2007) Pedometer Accuracy during walking over different surfaces. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 39 (10). pp. 1847-1850.

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Abstract

Purpose: This study examined the effect of surface (concrete, grass, dry beach sand, wet beach sand) and gender on pedometer accuracy during walking. Methods: Fifty-two healthy university students volunteered for this study and completed six 150-m walking trials for each of the four different surfaces while wearing a YAMAX SW-700 Digiwalker pedometer. For each trial, time, number of steps taken and number of steps registered by the pedometer were recorded. These variables and pedometer accuracy for each walking surface and gender were analyzed by two-way repeated-measures ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests. Results: Walking over dry beach sand significantly reduced walking speed (concrete, 5.6 +/- 0.5 km[middle dot]h-1; grass, 5.6 +/- 0.5 km[middle dot]h-1; dry beach sand, 5.0 +/- 0.5 km[middle dot]h-1: wet beach sand, 5.4 +/- 0.4 km[middle dot]h-1) and increased the number of steps taken (concrete, 190 +/- 13; grass, 186 +/- 12; dry beach sand, 207 +/- 12; wet beach sand, 194 +/- 11) and registered (concrete, 195 +/- 14; grass, 191 +/- 14; dry beach sand, 213 +/- 15; wet beach sand, 201 +/- 16) by the pedometer compared with concrete and grass. Compared with males, females registered a greater number of pedometer steps (204 +/- 18 vs 197 +/- 15) and a greater absolute (9 +/- 12 vs 3 +/- 7 steps) and relative (4.46 +/- 5.72 vs 1.63 +/- 3.57%) pedometer error during walking over dry beach sand. Conclusions: Walking on a soft surface such as dry beach sand significantly reduced walking speed and increased pedometer error for females compared with males, possibly by exacerbating hip and walking movements. Identification of gender and softer surfaces should be considered when documenting physical activity levels in field studies.

Item ID: 2666
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: walking surface; physical activity; gender; exercise measurement; validity
Additional Information:

ISSN: 0195-9131
Date Deposited: 25 Aug 2009 00:57
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences @ 100%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 8
Downloads: Total: 1
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