Development of saline ground water through transpiration of sea water

Fass, T., Cook, P.G., Stieglitz, T., and Herczeg, A.L. (2007) Development of saline ground water through transpiration of sea water. Ground Water, 45 (6). pp. 703-710.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-6584.20...

Abstract

As vegetation usually excludes salt during water uptake, transpiration will increase the salinity of the residual water. If the source water is sea water, then the residual water may become highly saline. In the unconfined coastal aquifer of the tropical Burdekin River delta, northeastern Australia, areas of highly saline ground water with chloride concentrations up to almost three times that of sea water occur up to 15 km from the present coastline, and are attributed to transpiration by mangrove vegetation during periods of high sea level. Radiogenic (14C) carbon isotope analyses indicate that ground water with chloride concentrations between 15,000 and 35,000 mg/L is mostly between 4000 and 6000 years old, at which time sea level was 2 to 3 m higher than present. Stable isotope analyses of oxygen-18 and deuterium show no evidence for evaporative enrichment of this water. Oxygen-18, deuterium, and stable (δ13C) carbon isotope analyses of ground water and soil water point to a recharge environment beneath the mangrove forests during this postglacial sea level high stand. During that period, transpiration of the mangrove forests would have led to high chloride concentrations in the residual ground water, without inducing isotopic fractionation. Due to the higher density, this hypersaline water moved downward through the aquifer by gravity and has formed lenses of highly saline ground water at the bottom of the unconfined aquifer.

Item ID: 2566
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: transpiration; ground water
ISSN: 1745-6584
Date Deposited: 06 May 2009 22:46
FoR Codes: 04 EARTH SCIENCES > 0405 Oceanography > 040503 Physical Oceanography @ 100%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9611 Physical and Chemical Conditions of Water > 961104 Physical and Chemical Conditions of Water in Marine Environments @ 100%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 15
Downloads: Total: 4
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page