"Makes you proud to be black eh?": Reflections on meaningful Indigenous research participation

Kelly, Jenny, Saggers, Sherry, Taylor, Kylie, Pearce , Glenn, Massey, Peter, Bull, Jennifer, Odo, Travis, Thomas, John, Billycan, Rosita, Judd, Jenni, Reilly, Susan, and Ahboo, Shayne (2012) "Makes you proud to be black eh?": Reflections on meaningful Indigenous research participation. International Journal for Equity in Health, 11 (40). pp. 1-15.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Version) - Accepted Version
Download (256Kb)
View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-9276-11-4...

Abstract

Abstract (provisional) This article outlines the meaningful participation of eight Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members employed as community researchers investigating the impact of pandemic influenza in rural and remote Indigenous communities in Australia. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation is now a requirement of health research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. There is a growing literature on the different approaches to such involvement. Fundamental to this literature is an acknowledgement that Indigenous communities are no longer prepared to be research objects for external, mostly non-Indigenous researchers, and demand a role in decisions about what is researched and how it will be researched. In this paper, we describe the protracted process for site identification and recruitment and training of community researchers. We focus on the backgrounds of the Indigenous researchers and their motivations for involvement, and the strengths and challenges posed by Indigenous people researching in their own communities. Throughout the paper our concern is to document how genuine participation and the building of research capacity can occur.

Discussion A key feature of the research was the employment, training and strengthening the capacity of local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members in the role of community researchers. A series of training workshops were conducted in northern Australia and focussed on qualitative research methods, including data collection, data analysis and writing. The Indigenous researchers collected the community-based data, and worked in partnership with experienced academic researchers in the analysis and compilation of community reports. Parts of those community reports, as well as additional information supplied by the community researchers, forms the basis of this article. As the demand increases for involvement of Indigenous community members as researchers, focus needs to be paid to what constitutes meaningful participation. If active participation in all aspects of the research process is intended, this necessitates close attention to the knowledge and skills required for this to occur at every stage. Building research capacity means not simply equipping local people to undertake research on a particular project, but to have the knowledge and skills to undertake research in other areas.

Conclusions There are considerable benefits for Indigenous people researching in their own communities. Most important for the community researchers on this project was the sense that they were doing important health work, not just conducting research. Given the persistent gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health, this is perhaps one of the most important contributions of this type of research. Whilst research outcomes are undoubtedly important, in many cases the process used is of greater importance.

Item ID: 22917
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Related URLs:
ISSN: 1475-9276
Date Deposited: 24 Aug 2012 00:01
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9203 Indigenous Health > 920399 Indigenous Health not elsewhere classified @ 100%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 2
Downloads: Total: 45
Last 12 Months: 4
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page