Pain tolerance selectively increased by a sweet-smelling odor

Prescott, John, and Wilkie, Jenell (2007) Pain tolerance selectively increased by a sweet-smelling odor. Psychological Science, 18 (4). pp. 308-311.

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Abstract

The mechanism underlying reported analgesic effects of odors in humans is unclear, although odor hedonics has been implicated. We tested whether odors that are sweet smelling through prior association with tasted sweetness might influence pain by activating the same analgesic mechanisms as sweet tastes. Inhalation of a sweet-smelling odor during a cold-pressor test increased tolerance for pain compared with inhalation of pleasant and unpleasant low-sweetness odors and no odor. There were no significant differences in pain ratings among the odor conditions. These results suggest that smelled sweetness can produce a naturally occurring conditioned increase in pain tolerance.

Item ID: 2291
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: olfaction; pain; associative learning; sweetness; flavour
Additional Information:

ISSN: 1467-9280
Date Deposited: 09 Jun 2009 04:48
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170103 Educational Psychology @ 40%
17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance @ 40%
17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology) @ 20%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences @ 100%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 13
Downloads: Total: 3
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