Cross cultural approaches to environmental research and management: a response to the dualisms inherent in the practice of western science?

Jacobson, Chris, and Stephens, Anne (2009) Cross cultural approaches to environmental research and management: a response to the dualisms inherent in the practice of western science? Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 39 (4). pp. 159-162.

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Abstract

[Extract] We would like to start this response by commending the Rakiura Tīt Islands Administering Committee and the University of Otago's research team for providing a substantive research project linking science and Mātauranga Māori; it takes courage to share such ideas in a way that respects the diversity of views and perspectives that exist in research partnerships. Here we attempt to deepen the reflection and discussion on the linkages between indigenous and non-indigenous research.

Moller et al. (2009) raise issues of the divisions between indigenous and scientific knowledge. These issues are not, however, limited to indigenous/non-indigenous partnerships. In internationally, the World Intellectual Property Organisation and academics alike acknowledge similarities between indigenous knowledge and knowledge of local communities (Oguamanam 2008). While indigenous peoples are often enclaved and become minorities within their own countries, Oguamanam (2008) highlights the uniting concern to avoid the misuse, misrepresentation and misappropriation of both indigenous and local peoples' knowledge. The term 'local knowledge' is often used to refer to that of majority peoples in developing countries under colonial rule (Agrawal 1995). Local knowledge within developed countries is also increasingly recognised as developmental practice is extended from developing to developed countries, and the technical knowledge of local communities is acknowledged, e.g., approaches such as adaptive management (see Allen et al. 2001; Jacobson et al. 2009: 487).

Item ID: 22016
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
ISSN: 1175-8899
Date Deposited: 18 Oct 2012 06:17
FoR Codes: 20 LANGUAGE, COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE > 2002 Cultural Studies > 200299 Cultural Studies not elsewhere classified @ 50%
16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1608 Sociology > 160808 Sociology and Social Studies of Science and Technology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 95 CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING > 9599 Other Cultural Understanding > 959999 Cultural Understanding not elsewhere classified @ 50%
97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences @ 50%
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