Influence of lower body compression garments on cardiovascular autonomic responses prior to, during and following submaximal cycling exercise

Leicht, Anthony, and Nakamura, Fabio (2012) Influence of lower body compression garments on cardiovascular autonomic responses prior to, during and following submaximal cycling exercise. In: Proceedings of the 5th Exercise & Sports Science Australia Conference and 7th Sports Dietitians Australia Update, p. 134. From: 5th Exercise & Sports Science Australia Conference and 7th Sports Dietitians Australia Update Research to Practice, 19-21 April 2012, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia.

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Abstract

Introduction: The use of compression garments (CG) has been adopted by many on the basis that these garments enhance performance and recovery. However, very few studies have examined the mechanisms for these potential enhancements, including cardiac autonomic modulations. Therefore, the current study examined the impact of lower body CG on the cardiovascular responses prior to, during and following submaximal cycling exercise. It was hypothesised that CG would result in a reduced HR response and greater cardiac autonomic modulations prior to, during and following submaximal cycling exercise.

Methods: Thirty (15 male, 15 female) healthy university students volunteered for this study after providing written informed consent. Participants undertook supine rest (10 mins), submaximal cycling exercise at a workload that approximated 70% of age-predicted maximum heart rate (10 mins) and supine recovery (10 mins) while wearing either normal clothing (CONTROL) or normal clothing + CG tights in a randomised order. Heart rate (HR) was recorded using a telemetric HR monitor while rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was assessed via the Borg 6-20 RPE scale every minute. Cardiovascular autonomic responses were assessed during the final 5 mins of rest, exercise and recovery as time-domain, frequency-domain and non-linear measures of HR variability (HRV). Additionally, the change in HR at 1-min (HRR1) and 2-min (HRR2) post-exercise and the rate of HR recovery (HRRtau) were assessed as indices of cardiac autonomic reactivation. Differences between variables (mean ± SD) were assessed via paired t-tests or 2-way ANOVA (clothing x stage) and pairwise comparisons with Bonferroni correction.

Results: There were no significant differences between CONTROL and CG for HR and RPE prior to, during and following submaximal cycling (p>0.05). Compared to rest, exercise resulted in a reduction of HRV that was similar for CONTROL and CG (p>0.05). However, a main effect for clothing was identified with a significantly lower non-linear measure of HRV (61.4 ± 47.8 vs. 67.1 ± 50.2 ms, p<0.05) for CG compared to CONTROL. Cardiac autonomic reactivation (HRR1, 42 ± 17 vs. 46± 13 bpm; HRR2, 59 ± 11 vs. 59 ± 8 bpm; HRRtau, 63.4 ± 22.3 vs. 65.1 ± 23.0 s,6 p>0.05) was comparable for CONTROL and CG.

Conclusion/Discussion: The current results indicated that HR and RPE prior to, during and following submaximal cycling exercise were unaffected by CG use. Further, cardiac autonomic reactivation following submaximal cycling was unaltered by CG use. In contrast, a non-linear measure of HRV was significantly lower during CG use that may indicate a potential limitation of CG on cardiovascular function. The use of CG does not enhance HRV or reduce HR prior to, during or following submaximal cycling.

Item ID: 21864
Item Type: Conference Item (Abstract / Summary)
ISBN: 978-0-9873065-0-0
Date Deposited: 18 Jun 2012 22:45
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920408 Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being) @ 100%
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