Neuroimmunological effects of physical exercise in depression

Eyre, Harris, and Baune, Bernhard T. (2012) Neuroimmunological effects of physical exercise in depression. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 26 (2). pp. 251-266.

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Abstract

The search for an extended understanding of the causes of depression, and for the development of additional effective treatments is highly significant. Clinical and pre-clinical studies suggest stress is a key mediator in the pathophysiology of depression. Exercise is a readily available therapeutic option, effective as a first-line treatment in mild to moderate depression. In pre-clinical models exercise attenuates stress-related depression-like behaviours. Cellular and humoral neuroimmune mechanisms beyond inflammation and oxidative stress are highly significant in understanding depression pathogenesis. The effects of exercise on such mechanisms are unclear. When clinical and pre-clinical data is taken together, exercise may reduce inflammation and oxidation stress via a multitude of cellular and humoral neuroimmune changes. Astrocytes, microglia and T cells have an antiinflammatory and neuroprotective functions via a variety of mechanisms. It is unknown whether exercise has effects on specific neuroimmune markers implicated in the pathogenesis of depression such as markers of immunosenescence, B or T cell reactivity, astrocyte populations, self-specific CD4+ T cells, T helper 17 cells or T regulatory cells.

Item ID: 20042
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: neuroimmunology, neurobiology, human, rodent, depression, exercise, physical activity, immunology, stress
ISSN: 1090-2139
Date Deposited: 13 Mar 2012 06:14
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1109 Neurosciences > 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920410 Mental Health @ 100%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 2
Downloads: Total: 1
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