The influence of union membership, precarious employment and government sectors on occupational stress, job security and job satisfaction

Au, Agnes, and Bennet, J (2011) The influence of union membership, precarious employment and government sectors on occupational stress, job security and job satisfaction. In: Combined Abstracts of 2011 Australian Psychology Conferences (2011), p. 140. From: 46th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society, 4 - 8 October, 2011, Canberra, ACT.

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Abstract

Over the last three decades workers have experienced a dramatic shift towards neo-liberalism characterised by a reduction of social and public programs and services, deregulation, privatisation, and increased competition in most markets. This transformation of the workforce has lead to a rise in occupational stress levels and a significant reduction in union membership. This study examined the differences in occupational stress, job security and satisfaction levels between union and non union members. It also examined occupational stress, security, and satisfaction levels of workers in precarious and non precarious employment, and compared levels between government and non government workers. The study was completed as a fourth year thesis. Therefore it had a small sample size (N=57) consisting of participants recruited from the small city of Cairns and James Cook University, and also the Australian Workers Union, and the Department of Child Protection Services. The questionnaire consisted of 4 scales: Occupational Stress Index, Job Security Index, Job Satisfaction Index and Demographic Questionnaire. Results indicated that union members had significantly higher occupational stress than non union members (p=0.000). However, there were no significant difference between the two groups in job security and satisfaction. We also found no significant difference in job stress, security or satisfaction levels between workers in precarious and non precarious employment, nor between workers in government and non government sector. The significantly higher stress levels found among union members compared to non union member implies that it be further examined.

Item ID: 19250
Item Type: Conference Item (Abstract / Summary)
ISBN: 978-0-909881-43-6
Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2011 05:57
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences @ 100%
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