Two-dimensional stick-slip on a soft elastic polymer: pattern generation using atomic force microscopy

Watson, J.A., Brown, C.L., Myhra, S., and Watson, G.S. (2006) Two-dimensional stick-slip on a soft elastic polymer: pattern generation using atomic force microscopy. Nanotechnology, 17 (10). pp. 2581-2589.

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Abstract

It has been demonstrated that it is possible to create laterally differentiated frictional patterning and three-dimensional structures using an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe on the surface of a soft elastic polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The resulting effect of contact mode imaging at low loading forces (<100 nN), observed in the lateral force mode, revealed a homogeneous pattern on the PDMS surface exhibiting higher friction. With higher loading forces ({\gg }100 nN) the effect is non-uniform, resulting in structures with depths on the nanometre scale. The topographic and frictional data revealed stick–slip responses in both the fast (orthogonal to the long axis of the lever) and slow (parallel to the long axis of the lever) directions of probe travel from scanning in a raster pattern. The stick–slip events are manifested in the form of a series of shallow channels spaced evenly apart on the polymer surface. Detailed friction loop analysis acquired during the manipulation process showed that the lateral force changed according to the strength of trapping of the tip with the polymer surface exhibiting significant in-plane deformation due to lateral forces being imposed. An incremental increase in the initial loading force resulted in an increase in in-plane displacement and a greater spacing between the stick lines/channels in the slow-scan direction. A decrease in channel length in the fast-scan direction is also observed as a result of an increase in static friction with normal force, resulting in greater surface deformation and shorter track length for sliding friction.

Item ID: 18208
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
ISSN: 1361-6528
Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2011 02:23
FoR Codes: 02 PHYSICAL SCIENCES > 0299 Other Physical Sciences > 029904 Synchrotrons; Accelerators; Instruments and Techniques @ 30%
02 PHYSICAL SCIENCES > 0299 Other Physical Sciences > 029999 Physical Sciences not elsewhere classified @ 30%
09 ENGINEERING > 0912 Materials Engineering > 091209 Polymers and Plastics @ 40%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences @ 50%
97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering @ 50%
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