Industrial relations in the Asia-Pacific region: towards an international and comparative analysis

Bamber, Greg J., and Leggett, Chris J. (2002) Industrial relations in the Asia-Pacific region: towards an international and comparative analysis. In: Abstracts and Plenary Papers: BUIRA 2002: British Universities Industrial Relations Association 52nd Annual Conference, pp. 1-5. From: BUIRA 2002: British Universities Industrial Relations Association 52nd Annual Conference, 4-6 July 2002, Stirling, UK.

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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the value of the comparative study of industrial relations with a consideration of developments in industrial relations in selected Asia-Pacific countries. Explanations of the rapid industrialisation of many Asia-Pacific countries have drawn on socio-economic approaches, the 'strong state' argument, neo-Confucian ethics and cultural 'collectivist' models (Verma et al. 1995:336). Rather than pursue cultural typologies, we follow Dore (1979) and discuss the industrial relations contexts that reflect the stages of economic development that these countries are passing through. Classifications may be somewhat arbitrary and there are many differences between the countries within the same category, but a pattern is discernible.

The first category includes the industrialised market economies (IMEs) of Japan, New Zealand and Australia. Recent industrial relations reforms in these countries are in part a response to the industrialisation of other countries in the Asia-Pacific region. The second category, sometimes referred to as the 'Asian Tigers', comprises the post-Japan, newly industrialised economies (NIEs) of Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. The third category comprises the next generation of industrialising economies and includes the People's Republic of China (PRC) and Indonesia. If it maintains its growth rates of the 1990s, the PRC will achieve NIE status within the next few decades. Although Indonesia achieved relatively high growth rates during the early to mid-1990s, the effect of the 1997 Asian economic crisis has been to leave it facing a period of political and economic uncertainty.

Item ID: 17161
Item Type: Conference Item (Abstract / Summary)
Keywords: industrial relations, comparative, Asia-Pacific
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2012 05:53
FoR Codes: 15 COMMERCE, MANAGEMENT, TOURISM AND SERVICES > 1503 Business and Management > 150306 Industrial Relations @ 100%
SEO Codes: 91 ECONOMIC FRAMEWORK > 9104 Management and Productivity > 910401 Industrial Relations @ 100%
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